The novel is reminiscent of Agatha Christie's "Then There were None" so, knowing what was to happen, my interest in the story at the beginning was low. Unlike Christie's novel, Ware's novel is set in the Alps during skiing season at a resort for posh skiers. A small English music app company rents an isolated chalet and its members enjoy a morning of skiing before an afternoon business meeting. The novel becomes more interesting in the last third of the book as the tension and the suspense pick up when murderer and victim play cat and mouse which involves a death defying skiing chase. The murderer's motives are revealed in that section, well before the conclusion, which help to heighten the danger for the remaining victim. There are descriptions of dangerous ski runs, hurt skiers, an avalanche or two, murdered skiers, and finger pointing around the circle of friends, all red herrings, until the murderer is revealed. While the beginning of the novel is slow, stay with it; the novel does become a page turner. Ware uses alternating short chapters to move her story along as she lets her characters tell their thoughts, feelings, and observations about the events happening around them. Since many authors are using this method of story telling, I almost groan now when I open up a new book and see those chapter headings with names of the characters atop the page. I didn't like the many uses of the F word and other swear words that Ware thinks her privileged techy 20 year olds would use.

gloryb's rating:
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