Paris Trout

Paris Trout

A Novel

eBook - 2014
Average Rating:
2
Rate this:
Pete Dexter's National Book Award-winning tour de force tells the mesmerizing story of a shocking crime that shatters lives and exposes the hypocrisies of a small Southern town. The time and place: Cotton Point, Georgia, just after World War II. The event: the murder of a fourteen-year-old black girl by a respected white citizen named Paris Trout, who feels he's done absolutely nothing wrong. As a trial looms, the crime eats away at the social fabric of Cotton Point, through its facade of manners and civility. Trout's indifference haunts his defense lawyer; his festering paranoia warps his timid, quiet wife; and Trout himself moves closer to madness as he becomes obsessed with his cause--and his vendettas. -- --William Styron "Dexter's powerfully emotional novel doesn't have any brakes. Hang on, because you won't be able to stop until the finish."--Chicago Tribune
Publisher: New York : Random House Trade Paperbacks, 2014
ISBN: 9780812987393
081298739X
Characteristics: 1 online resource

Related Resources


Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

v
voisjoe1_0
Nov 08, 2015

Pete Dexter, author of Paris Trout (1988), is also a columnist for the Sacramento Bee. He has lived in the South, Midwest, and the Plain States, and he has been beaten by a mob, angry at his newspaper writing. He has seen the seedy side of life and he writes about it in his novels. The characters seem authentic Southern, both black and white, and run the gamut from the ignorant to the indifferent middle, to wife beaters, adulterers, murderers, tax evaders, racists, and cheats. There is not much room left for ordinary middle of the road Southerners. Dexter leaves that to the ordinary writers that pass on the mythology that white Southerners are all Jesus loving saints.

l
lukasevansherman
Aug 04, 2014

Winner of the National Book Award, Pete Dexter's intense, harrowing novel is set in a small town in Georgia and about the simmering tensions that erupt after a disliked, but prominent citizen shoots two black girls. The title character is among the most unpleasant you'll meet, but Dexter makes him, if not sympathetic, wholly believable and even a little sad. There are echoes of great Southern writers like Faulkner and Lee, but Dexter has a sharp style and moral gravity all his own. Filmed with Dennis Hopper and Ed Harris.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at PPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top