Winesburg, Ohio

Winesburg, Ohio

Book - 1995
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In this moving collection of interrelated stories, Ohio-born Sherwood Anderson (1876-1941) illuminates the loneliness and frustration -- spiritual, emotional and artistic -- of life in a small American town. Winesburg, Ohio subtly portrays as well a young writer's coming of age, searching for love, yearning for a less stifling world.
Through the eyes of young George Willard, the inner lives of many of Winesburg's inhabitants open to us. Before George leaves the community, we have learned much about his mother Elizabeth, his friend Helen White, his teacher Kate Swift and other Winesburg residents -- the lonely, sensitive Dr. Reefy, the tormented Rev. Charles Hartman and the enigmatic Wing Biddlebaum among them.
Through Anderson's art, their stories are woven into a powerful portrayal of community life, and, ironically, of the isolation its close atmosphere can engender. A great success on its first publication in 1919, Winesburg, Ohio profoundly influenced a generation of fiction writers with its deeply moving poetic realism. It endures as a classic portrait of American life.
Publisher: New York : Dover Publications, 1995
ISBN: 9780486282695
Characteristics: v., 153 p. ; 22 cm


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NYPLRecommends Jul 28, 2014

NYPL Staff Pick
Quite possibly the original novel of stories work, Sherwood Anderson's novel debuted over 100 years ago. Each solitary character gets a chapter; the chapters in turn are lightly woven together around a shared small town and a visiting reporter. I read this book in high school and think about often many years later.
- Lynn Lobash, Readers Services

multcolib_central Jul 25, 2014

Rather than an idyllic portrayal of american small town life, these connected stories are about psychological isolation, loneliness, and frustration brought about by small town mores. Anderson possesses brilliant insight into humor thought and emotion and expresses his vision with beautiful prose.

sharonb122 Sep 03, 2013

At first I did not understand why this was such a classic, but I did understand many of the things after I read the commentary. Finally, I simply saw much humor in the stories. Which person was crazier! In the chapter, "Queer," when Elmer finished talking to Mook, Mook went to tell someone that Elmer was crazy, but he was telling his cows. Glad I read this.

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